• Matthias Ferrieres

Cancer Statistics to know

Cancer is among the leading causes of death worldwide. In 2018, there were 18.1 million new cases and 9.5 million cancer-related deaths worldwide.

By 2040, the number of new cancer cases per year is expected to rise to 29.5 million and the number of cancer-related deaths to 16.4 million.



Generally, cancer rates are highest in countries whose populations have the highest life expectancy, education level, and standard of living. But for some cancer types, such as cervical cancer, the reverse is true, and the incidence rate is highest in countries in which the population ranks low on these measures.

Approximately 39.5% of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetimes (based on 2015–2017 data). In 2020, an estimated 16,850 children and adolescents ages 0 to 19 will be diagnosed with cancer and 1,730 will die of the disease.


What is the survival rate of cancer?

Many of the most commonly diagnosed cancers have ten-year survival of 50% or more (2010-11). More than 80% of people diagnosed with cancer types which are easier to diagnose and/or treat survive their cancer for ten years or more (2010-11).


Why is cancer so common? The main reason cancer risk overall is rising is because of our increasing lifespan. And the researchers behind these new statistics reckon that about two-thirds of the increase is due to the fact we're living longer. The rest, they think, is caused by changes in cancer rates across different age groups.


What cancers have the worst survival rate? The cancers with the lowest five-year survival estimates are mesothelioma (7.2%), pancreatic cancer (7.3%) and brain cancer (12.8%). The highest five-year survival estimates are seen in patients with testicular cancer (97%), melanoma of skin (92.3%) and prostate cancer (88%)


What increases risk of cancer?

The most common risk factors for cancer include aging, tobacco, sun exposure, radiation exposure, chemicals, and other substances, some viruses and bacteria, certain hormones, family history of cancer, alcohol, poor diet, lack of physical activity, or being overweight.






sources:

https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/

https://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/cancer-basics/what-cancer

https://www.singaporecancersociety.org.sg/learn-about-cancer/cancer-basics/what-is-cancer.html

https://www.nccs.com.sg/patient-care/cancer-types/cancer-statistics


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